We all bleed red, but are NOT equal

Yesterday’s post automatically linked to another blog with an entry about the Fort Mims Massacre, in which hundreds of white settlers were apparently killed by indians.    The writer is quite angry (and rightly horrified) by the atrocities that supposedly happened there, concluding:

The Indians have always fought each other, well before whites arrived in America. The story above is just one example of how offensive and savagely barbaric the Indians really were. It’s the stuff they don’t teach in school.

500 whites and mixed-blood people were murdered including women and children, and 250 scalps were collected by the Indians. The blacks were mostly spared as to become slaves to the Indians, (which were later used as human shields and all quickly killed).

Notice how they call the savage Indians the non-offensive word “warriors”, when “barbarians” is a perfect fit.

So… It’s a bummer he didn’t include anything about why the fort was there in the first place (likely to defend encroaching pioneers who were taking over indian lands, or launch offensive attacks to drive the natives out) , and any events that lead to the massacre. 

I’ve heard there were violent tribes, and they did war against each other, but can guess that there were probably some instigating factors here that were conveniently left out. 

I just tried wikipedia to find out more about the massacre and though it’s very clear the attack at Fort Mims was not random or completely unprovoked, I am still confused.  Maybe someone else can figure out what, exactly, happened there:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Mims_massacre

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Burnt_Corn

 

I would love to leave it at that, but am compelled to share the blog writer’s bio, which he proudly displays on his main page.   I’m a little scared it’ll draw the guy to my site, but can’t resist sharing.  I’ve gotten familiar with the tragic events that happened here during the settlement period, but have a hard time understanding the mentality that allowed them to happen.  This, unfortunately, kinda helps…

About

I am an American. I am white. “White guilt” is a political term used to oppress white people. I am not guilty. White pride, not white guilt. Just because we all bleed red, does NOT make us equal. Politically, only whites can be racist. I don’t put much into politics. Specific races destroy our land, our culture, and our people. The liberals allow the change of history if it offends non-whites. Schools are brainwashing white students to believe their multicultural propaganda, and to promote “white guilt”. Only a nigger can say nigger, bullshit. Blacks try to steal the creation of inventions from ‘peanut butter’ to the ‘great civilizations’. The United States of America was built by white Europeans ALONE. Facts mean nothing to liberal eyes. Faith, Hope, and Change are nothing more than feel-good words, in a fantasy life. We speak english, you get the fuck out.

Just leave me and my family alone.

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6 Responses to We all bleed red, but are NOT equal

  1. Kym says:

    How sad to feel only your own pain and not be able to translate it into seeing other’s.

    • lynette77 says:

      Oh, that’s a much more understanding response than mine. Thanks, Kym, for reminding me that it is sad… Meeting anger with anger does no good.

  2. Kelly says:

    There is some land. It is now called North America. Some people were here before and then some other people came. The newer folks were lighter in color. They took over the land. It was a painful and costly takeover. Many humans bleed that red blood. Land is very important to humans. Humans seem to do this, take land from other humans. It seems to be the nature of humans. And so when the lighter skinned people became known as the ‘winning’ or land holding ‘team’ for some this meant they were better of more blessed by their God, or that is was the plan of their God.
    After land pecking order is important to humans. To win is to be on top. To see one as better, or more right than the others actually a very human drive.
    The poster you have quoted has a very common outlook.
    It needs to be understood as it carries a lot of momentum in the world today.

    • lynette77 says:

      See, this is why I love comments (and commenters). This is a great reminder to step back and expand my perspective and remember that understanding is the first step, not judgement…

  3. Arvilla says:

    Take a look at the facts at the historical monument for this battle:
    http://www.exploresouthernhistory.com/fortmims1.html

    It seems some people will spew hate along with inaccurate information. How long does it take to Google “Fort Mims, AL 1813”?

    I know it was sad, but to twist facts to support an empty argument is worse.

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