Eureka 1906, The Best at Our Command

Eureka 1906

I know people puzzle over the blatant consumption of our natural resources over the last 150 years, but the caption under this photo really explains it well.  Resources were resources.  The best was at our command.  My guess is that people naively thought (as some still do, unfortunately) that there would always be enough to meet our needs.

On another topic, can you imagine two thousand steamships & other vessels coming into our bay each year…? ! ?

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4 Responses to Eureka 1906, The Best at Our Command

  1. random guy says:

    By this time, all the senior hupa, yurok etc. must have been shaking their heads in disbelief. 2000 vessels per year…that’s about 5 or 6 big boats daily…that’d be something to see! Especially large sailboats along the coast.

    • Lynette M says:

      Yeah, I can’t even imagine all that traffic in our bay. Unfortunately I’m sure most of it was taking resources (lumber, fish, etc.) OUT of our area. Still amazing though, and lets us know what is possible here if we come up with the right industry…

  2. Katy says:

    I’m curious about how people felt about redwood forests before the white settlers chopped most of them down. From what little I’ve read, it sounds like most of the local Indians didn’t really spend much time in the redwoods. Also, I kind of imagine white immigrants being kind of intimidated by the thick, dense forests, and probably being a little relieved to level them and transform the landscape into something more open and familiar. I wonder if the forests are only appreciated for their natural beauty now that there are only a few stands left (which is kind of a sad thought), but I don’t really know.

    • Lynette M says:

      I know Lucy Young, a Native American, was a little girl in the 1860s when the whites came and she described the redwoods as dark and scary. Didn’t like being in them at all…

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