When Chapala Cafe was Herb’s Corner

October 17, 2015
HSU Special Collection: 2012.02.0097 (Yale/Palmquist Collection)

HSU Special Collection: 2012.02.0097 (Yale/Palmquist Collection)

Funny-I imagined the Fairwind as a hotel (the name is now painted on the side of the building  that houses Good Relations in Old Town, Eureka- I’ll have to read it more carefully…).

And it looks like we’ve had two hour parking in Old Town for at least 50 years…

Eureka.2ndStreet.Fairwinds.Chapala


Buon Gusto Restaurant, Eureka

October 11, 2015

Then

BonGustoRestaurant.HSU.2012.02.0137

This photo is from HSU’s collection-click on the photo then click on the photo on HSU’s page again to see a larger version…

 

Now

 

BonGusto.eagle-house.now

Year ago the Eagle House was used as a sort 0f mini-mall, with boutique stores off the upper balcony.  On a ghost tour I was told the building to the left was originally on the corner and they moved it to construct the bigger building.


One of Many Lucys

October 8, 2015

Lucy.Murder in Arcata.NCJCover..F.2015.1008

I recently (finally) finished a story about Lucy Romero for the North Coast Journal. It is an important story and I am thankful to Thad Greenson, their editor, for working so long and patiently with me to get it done.

There is one point I failed to include though and so want to share it here. This is from a post I did years ago, but it is just as important to remember now…

In the western movie, Broken Trail  , there is a scene where Robert Duvall struggles to learn the names of five Chinese girls under his care.  They speak no English and growing frustrated, Duvall’s character points to each one in turn and names them, “One, Two, Three, Four… “.  The girls accept the names, because they have no choice.

The same thing happened here.  When the white settlers arrived, they re “named” the native people.  Smo-Wa became Henry Capell (he was from the village of Capell).  Corn-no-wish became Weichpec Oscar.  Zo-wish-wish, a Wiyot woman related to Lucy’s daughter, Annie, was also known as “Rose”.

Lucy, the woman I write about, was only one of many “Lucys”.