Fortuna’s Love of Cars Continues …

July 26, 2014
Source: County of Humboldt Collection

Source: County of Humboldt Collection

Shoot, this may be one of my favorite photos–there are so many fantastic details.

PLEASE click to enlarge and you’ll notice the Fortuna Theater, playing When a Man’s a Man, on the left  and that the town loved cars long before this weekend’s Auto Xpo.

Check out the billboards on the left. Looks like they also had two fueling stations, tire shop AND a garage/repair shop.  And is that a Chevy Dealership on the left?

Check out the AutoExpo down in Fortuna this weekend and you may see some of these very same cars cruising Main Street.


Blue Lake’s Perigot Park-Music Fest Now (and pic from “then”)

July 24, 2014
County of Humboldt Collection

County of Humboldt Collection

Park looks a little different now but still a lot going on, including a music festival this Saturday (July 26)…

https://www.facebook.com/bluelakemusicfest


Trinidad Town Hall-Before the Tennis Courts

February 25, 2013

Trinidad.TownHallCropped.HSU.1999030849

Granted, it it now too late to help get the word out about the concert I attended in this building yesterday but it was a packed house anyway (Good job to Julie Fulkerson and all the other organizers).  In Love with the Muse Piano Voce was a benefit for the new Trinidad library and was held in the (old) Trinidad Town Hall.  I noticed the wonderfully wavy windows as I listened to the music.

According the photo source (HSU Special Collections), the hall was probably built about 1915. “Trinidad in early days had one telephone at McConnaha’s store on the Bay at Trinity and Edwards corner,” the HSU site also tells us.


Arcata Union Newspaper; various dates: 1895-1905

June 23, 2011

Visitor “Skippy” was generous enough to share the following as a comment after my post/photo of Arcata High  and (Skippy, I hope you understand that) I just didn’t want to risk anyone missing this great info…

Per Skippy:

Here’s some of the exciting Arcata news that these pictured high schoolers likely would have known about at the time. Arcata was a happening and progressive place:

“One of the large timbers on which the engine and dynamos for the Arcata Electric Light Works will be placed in position shortly was hauled Wednesday. One end was fastened to a pair of truck wheels and the other end dragged. It required three span of horses to drag it and then considerable difficulty was experienced in turning corners. Electricians Taylor and Littlefield are hard at work wiring the residence on the hill. About 500 lights have been put in up to date. The arc lights are ready and so soon as the incandescent dynamo arrives and is put in place Arcata will have her lights.” Read more about electricity in Arcata here

Advertisement: ‘”The Glorious 4th is coming so let the Eagle SCREAM and Old Glory FLUTTER to the Wind from the mast heads. Arcata Celebrates and Begins the Day’s festivities with a National Salute of 13 Guns at Sunrise. A Grand Procession will form at Armory Hall, at 9 o’clock in the following order: 1) The Arcata Cornet Band. 2) Co, B, 10th Inf. Bat., N. G. C. 3) Citizens on foot. 4) School Children in Floating Palace. 5) Officers of the Day in Carriages will parade though the principal streets, terminating on the plaza which will be beautifully decorated for the occasion. …’”

“Arcata has demonstrated the fact that a good (4th of July) celebration can be gotten up on short notice and carried to a successful issue in spite of the fact that almost every other place in the county had a celebration also. As early as Monday morning the decorating committee commenced delivering redwood trees around the plaza and up the principal streets … by Tuesday night the town looked like a miniature park. …The 4th opened with the firing of the national salute on the plaza … The first event of the day was the hose tournament … The Calithuptian parade from Alliance came into view … There were about 75 wheels in line and some very funny and original costumes were seen. The man who couldn’t keep his pedals caused much merriment as did also the man with the hay rope whiskers. After circling around the plaza they gathered around the bandstand where Grand Calithumpian Orator Tim Spaulding, addressed his motley followers. … After the noon intermission, the afternoon games and races were called. The first was a 6 mile, free for all, bicycle road race, beginning and ending on the plaza … Celebration Gossip: Everybody said those 2 little girls in the Calithumpian parade were “just too cute” and those 2 boys fooled lots of people including the Calithumpians themselves.”

See a similar parade on the plaza here

From “Special Notes: ‘”$25 Reward will be paid for information that will lead to the arrest and conviction of the party or parties that stole my chickens. We have in our midst a genuine chicken thief. Chickens come home to roost, and this thief will be caught, for I know you just as well as if I had caught you in the act, for you, like some other thieves, forgot to cover your tracks. … It is well known that I am a confirmed invalid and a party that would steal chickens from me, would steal acorns from a blind sow. I live in the Frances house, and my name is Peter McGeorge.’”

In the “Special Column” : ‘”For Rent — A nice six room, sunny cottage, two blocks west the plaza. Rent $5.50 per month, inquire of Gustave Muhlberg.”

Mulberg adopted Charles, Lucy’s son.  Read more about Charles here

“T. J. Crawford has accepted the agency of the Imperial ($105) and the Elliot ($85) Bicycles– and will have four new wheels up on the steamer to-day. Any prospective buyer may have use of wheel for one week, and if not satisfactory in every respect, have the privilege of returning the same. Mr. Crawford will sell on easy installments to reliable persons. Call and inspect the wheels at Crawford’s store.”

“Russell, the bicycle, horse and all around thief, was finally captured at the Jacoby Creek quarry last Saturday and Howell’s horse and Martin’s rifle and pistol recovered. He is now in jail in Eureka awaiting conviction and sentence. As well as being a first-class thief, he is a first-class liar. He denies, without blinking his eyes, that he was at Trinidad, or that he robbed Martin’s cabin or stole Howell’s horse.”

See cool bikes here

Advertisement: “Back Again From Europe! By the solicitation of many friends and patients, Dr. H. Ehrlich the Eminent Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon From Berlin, Germany, will make his next visit to Arcata, Tuesday, April 25th, Union Hotel, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., One Day Only and return once a month. Do you want that Catarrh cured? Do you want that Deafness cured? Do you want to see with those Weak, Watry, Dim Eyes? If so, go and consult Dr. Ehrlich this trip.”

</b “Advertisement: Customers should bear in mind that with every purchase made by a lady amounting to $1 or over, she receives a high grade toilet article free. And every school child, with a purchase of a pair of shoes, receives a valuable and instructive pocket encyclopedia. Humboldt Manufacturing Co.”

Front page news: “Arcata not only has a fine natural park now, but a beautiful picnic ground as well, and the number of spirited men and women who helped to make Park Day a success may well be proud of their efforts… Men were seen wending their way up towards the park carrying axes, brush hooks, mattocks and other tools, and by the middle of the forenoon, a considerable clearing was the result, and brush fires were burning in every direction … People were surprised at the extent of the level land available for a ground, there being about 5 acres in one piece. Just above this is a sort of bench, making an ideal place for a band platform. The place where the dance platform will probably be located is level, without stumps … Several trees suitable for hanging swings were left, and when the work is completed, as fine a picnic ground as can be found in the country will be seen. …”

(Arcata Union Newspaper; various dates: 1895-1905)

THANK YOU SKIPPY.  THIS WAS AWESOME !


Old Town, Eureka Parade, c. 1925

May 16, 2011

Eureka, c. 1925

 

 I have to admit I am not a big parade fan, but I am really glad one took this photo.


Casebeer shot through the breast

March 3, 2010

 

Continued from Part 1

And Part 2

An inquest was held by Justice Jameson of Eel River (the Fortuna area).  Jameson examined Casebeer’s body and declared the case a homicide.     

Neighbors, as is typical, talked about the murder and a “squaw” “intimated” to James Tukesbury,  a local farmer (and white man) that Indians may have committed the crime. 

Though many of Humboldt County’s indigenous people died at the hands of whites (in early September, seven were killed for slaughtering  “a few head of cattle”), the murder of a white man was uncommon.   The murder of a white man at the hands of an Indian was considered an egregious and intolerable crime.

Local Natives were questioned and Jack, an Indian living with Tukesbury, most likely as a servant, finally admitted that he witnessed the murder.    According to Jack, he was walking by Casebeer’s house with another Indian , “Big Jack” , and two Indian women when they spotted Casebeer’s gun through a window.  Casebeer was in the distance chopping down trees and hadn’t seen them.   Big Jack decided to steal Casebeer’s gun and shoot him for being “very bad”.  Jack said he protested, fearing the murder of a white man would prompt the whites to “plenty kill Indians”, but Big Jack climbed through Casebeer’s window and retrieved the gun. He then approached Casebeer and shot him “through the breast”, killing him.   Big Jack then hid Casebeer’s body by pulling it into the brush.

To be continued…


Killing a gym full of children

February 26, 2010

 

This week marks the 150th anniversary of the Indian Island Massacre.

While I know this anniversary is being recognized by tribal members and others , I think it is most important to remember that that those killed were people,  and not just “Indians”. 

John Grisham wrote the book, A Time to Kill, about a black father in the deep south who kills two white men that raped his daughter.  

Through much of the book, race is the overarching issue.  The death of two white men at the hands of a negro.  Two of “us” killed by one of “them”,  and it is only when the jurors are urged to imagine the victim as a little white girl and her father as a father, instead of a black man, that they are able to sympathize.  They are finally able to recognize a family who suffered a great injustice they simply could not abide.

If one hundred and fifty school children and their mothers were brutally murdered during a school event, everyone in the community would recognize the loss years later. This massacre, one of too many that happened in this area during the settlement period, should be no different.  

If you have to, picture a school gym full of parents and children. Imagine a basketball game or school play, everyone joyous, the community together.  Then imagine five or six men coming in and locking the doors behind them.  They are carrying hatchets and knives and you watch from the stands as cheerleaders with ponytails and  boys with long legs and hair in their eyes are struck down, their skulls split with axes, screaming as they fall bleeding and dying to the floor.  Imagine toddlers, who moments earlier, were crawling on the stands, stabbed and cast aside.  Imagine watching as parents are beaten and killed as they run to protect their children.   Imagine the community’s  pain.  Imagine the loss of so much potential. The loss of so many people…

This happened.  Here.  And it makes no difference that they were “Indian”.  Please take a moment to honor the victims and their families.