OLLI Class Tomorrow- Enslaved in Humboldt

June 10, 2020
image.little upperlake girl.Hudson

Painting by Grace Hudson

Today is the last day to register for my upcoming OLLI Class focused on the history of indenture in Humboldt County- and Caroline Wright- a young girl indentured, or effectively enslaved, right here in our community.

Please click here to learn more about the class and/or enroll

More information….

Over the years I have shared a lot on this blog and in the community about Lucy Romero, a woman brutally murdered in Arcata in 1862.

The upcoming class is through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Humboldt State University (OLLI at HSU)

This class focuses on Carrie, Lucy’s daughter, who was indentured, or legally enslaved, following her mother’s death. I spoke about Carrie at our fall Humboldt Bay History Symposium  but this class will allow me to take a deeper dive into Humboldt’s settlement period. I will talk about the culture and laws that allowed the practice of kidnapping and human trafficking to flourish in Northern California. I will also talk about the experiences of victims like Carrie. This is not an easy history to talk about . But it is an important one.

Please click here to enroll in the class

 


Lashed and Bound by the Pacific- Humboldt Map 1865

June 7, 2020

cover image

Old maps have been popular posts according to my stats, so below you’ll find another fun one.

AJ Doolittle published the map below in 1865- which,  if you’ll notice the detail on the left, was accepted by the county supervisors on February 9. Interesting that William Carson, whose buildings have been the subject of past posts,  represented Eureka and Union (later Arcata)  townships.

According to this blog,  the map’s creator, Alonzo J. Doolittle, was born in Vermont in 1821 and came to California during the gold rush. Apparently AJ  was a road and bridge builder as well as a map maker.

Please click to enlarge the map- though you’ll need to be patient, as it is a VERY large file and moves slowly…   You can also try to access the map HERE if the link below is too slow…

There is a wonderful narrative about Humboldt on the right and when you look at the map, you’ll find that Ferndale was not yet and Arcata was still Union on the main map. Many property owners are listed, including Augustus Jacoby of Jacoby Storehouse fame and J (Joe) Russ, whose descendants still have ranches and timberland in Humboldt …

You can also see our many trails to the mines and elsewhere…

Doolittle Complete.HSULink.Archive.gov

Source: HSU Special Collection

 

I pulled this fun little description of early Humboldt off the map. I love that they noted that we are twice the size of Rhode Island and about equal to Delaware- with a fraction of the population. I also love that we are “lashed and bound by the Pacific Ocean” and “destitute of the bleak winds of San Francisco”. Hmmm….

Humboldt.Desc.1865

And here are some interesting ag stats…

Copy of Doolittle Complete.HSULink.Archive.gov

 


1866 Map of Northern California

May 26, 2020

I ran across this web entry on Fort Baker – and the map below,  by accident, of course. But for those who like old maps and/or early Humboldt history, it is pretty cool.

Interesting that the town of Centreville, now really just a beach outside of Ferndale, was a place before Fortuna (originally Springville) was…

Centerville was also the location of a well known shipwreck and (maybe if it is still standing) the location of an historical landmark.

Please click the map to enlarge.

 


Enslaved in Humboldt

May 23, 2020
image.little upperlake girl.Hudson

Painting by Grace Hudson

Over the years I have shared a lot on this blog and in the community about Lucy Romero, a woman brutally murdered in Arcata in 1862.

Next month I teach a class through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Humboldt State University (OLLI at HSU)

This class focuses on Carrie, Lucy’s daughter, who was indentured, or legally enslaved, following her mother’s death. I spoke about Carrie at our fall Humboldt Bay History Symposium  but this class will allow me to take a deeper dive into Humboldt’s settlement period. I will talk about the culture and laws that allowed the practice of kidnapping and human trafficking to flourish in Northern California. I will also talk about the experiences of victims like Carrie. This is not an easy history to talk about . But it is an important one.

Please click here to enroll in the class

 


Fort Humboldt Art Installation Starts April 23

April 20, 2016

SITE-SPECIFIC ART EXPLORING HISTORY OF FORT HUMBOLDT TO BE INSTALLED IN EUREKA

PressRelease_NHubbard.Map_v2

New York-based, Eureka-raised artist Nick Hubbard will present a series of sculptural installations around town that engage with the history of Fort Humboldt.  The works will be first set in place this coming Saturday, April 23, 2016.  Some of the installations will disappear within a few days, other may take longer but they are all temporary.

A participatory event on Sunday, April 24, will accompany the installations.  The artist will be on-site at Fort Humboldt, and citizens are invited to come and jointly build a collection of paper models of the fort buildings.  These models will contain messages written by participants that will be shared back with the community over a timespan corresponding to the activity of the Fort.

The project, Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is derived from digital models constructed using documentary photographs of Fort Humboldt, utilizes 3D printing technology combined with traditional model-making, and takes the form of a series of expanded dioramas that change over time.

Nick Hubbard is currently a Master’s candidate at the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.  Through Various Hazards is his thesis.  For more information, contact the project at varioushazards@gmail.com or visit the project website, http://www.varioushazards.com.

Through Various Hazards is on Twitter @varioushazards.

#forthumboldt or #varioushazards

CONTACT:  E-mail: varioushazards@gmail.com


Survey about Fort Humboldt

April 1, 2016
Fort Humboldt Entrance Signs - 2
Nicholas Hubbard, who grew up in Humboldt and is currently going to school on the east coast, is doing a masters project focused on Fort Humboldt. He is asking local folks to respond to his survey-which will help him with his efforts.  Please take a moment to take the survey (it is quick and simple and will help him immensely). Thank you.
~L
Survey Link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/83SJHKL
From Nick:
“Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is a series of site specific installation and participatory performance events created by artist Nick Hubbard, that will take place in late April in Eureka.  The work examines the meaning of Fort Humboldt in the present day.
Nick has designed a survey as part of Through Various Hazards.  Your anonymous responses may appear as quotes on installation plaques, in tweets by the artist, or on the project website.  By participating you have the opportunity to enrich the community’s understanding of one of its foundational sites and share what Eureka’s history means to you.

The questions in the survey are open to interpretation, and there’s no right way to answer them. Whether you grew up going to Fort Humboldt, or you’ve never been, you are invited to share your perspective.  And please share widely amongst your Eureka and Humboldt circles.”


One of Many Lucys

October 8, 2015

 

I recently (finally) finished a story about Lucy Romero for the North Coast Journal. It is an important story and I am thankful to Thad Greenson, their editor, for working so long and patiently with me to get it done.

There is one point I failed to include though and so want to share it here. This is from a post I did years ago, but it is just as important to remember now…

In the western movie, Broken Trail  , there is a scene where Robert Duvall struggles to learn the names of five Chinese girls under his care.  They speak no English and growing frustrated, Duvall’s character points to each one in turn and names them, “One, Two, Three, Four… “.  The girls accept the names, because they have no choice.

The same thing happened here.  When the white settlers arrived, they re “named” the native people.  Smo-Wa became Henry Capell (he was from the village of Capell).  Corn-no-wish became Weichpec Oscar.  Zo-wish-wish, a Wiyot woman related to Lucy’s daughter, Annie, was also known as “Rose”.

Lucy, the woman I write about, was only one of many “Lucys”.

 


Acme Garnishing Set & Oriental Mixture Tobacco

April 14, 2013

FrenchGulch.Merch1.Toothpaste-Personal

This is one of many  photos that will be coming from my trip to French Gulch-a gold mining town just off Hwy 299 west of Redding. Please let me know if you can identify the product from Del Norte County.


The Old Mining Town of Trinidad

March 23, 2013

HC.Trinidad.PstCard.OldMiningTown.StHwyLib

HC.Trinidad.Pre1915


Little Known History of Slavery in California

January 22, 2013
Child captives (who became child slaves)

Child captives (who became child slaves)

I was honored recently to be able to participate in the TedX Eureka  event where I presented on the History of Slavery (indenture) in California. That video is now posted on youtube:

Link to TedX Video

If you would like me to give a presentation similar to that in the video to your civic group or classroom, please email me at lynette.mullen@gmail.com.  

It is not pleasant history, but it is important and has been lost and forgotten too many times.

~Lynette