Fort Humboldt Art Installation Starts April 23

April 20, 2016

SITE-SPECIFIC ART EXPLORING HISTORY OF FORT HUMBOLDT TO BE INSTALLED IN EUREKA

PressRelease_NHubbard.Map_v2

New York-based, Eureka-raised artist Nick Hubbard will present a series of sculptural installations around town that engage with the history of Fort Humboldt.  The works will be first set in place this coming Saturday, April 23, 2016.  Some of the installations will disappear within a few days, other may take longer but they are all temporary.

A participatory event on Sunday, April 24, will accompany the installations.  The artist will be on-site at Fort Humboldt, and citizens are invited to come and jointly build a collection of paper models of the fort buildings.  These models will contain messages written by participants that will be shared back with the community over a timespan corresponding to the activity of the Fort.

The project, Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is derived from digital models constructed using documentary photographs of Fort Humboldt, utilizes 3D printing technology combined with traditional model-making, and takes the form of a series of expanded dioramas that change over time.

Nick Hubbard is currently a Master’s candidate at the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.  Through Various Hazards is his thesis.  For more information, contact the project at varioushazards@gmail.com or visit the project website, http://www.varioushazards.com.

Through Various Hazards is on Twitter @varioushazards.

#forthumboldt or #varioushazards

CONTACT:  E-mail: varioushazards@gmail.com


Survey about Fort Humboldt

April 1, 2016
Fort Humboldt Entrance Signs - 2
Nicholas Hubbard, who grew up in Humboldt and is currently going to school on the east coast, is doing a masters project focused on Fort Humboldt. He is asking local folks to respond to his survey-which will help him with his efforts.  Please take a moment to take the survey (it is quick and simple and will help him immensely). Thank you.
~L
Survey Link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/83SJHKL
From Nick:
“Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is a series of site specific installation and participatory performance events created by artist Nick Hubbard, that will take place in late April in Eureka.  The work examines the meaning of Fort Humboldt in the present day.
Nick has designed a survey as part of Through Various Hazards.  Your anonymous responses may appear as quotes on installation plaques, in tweets by the artist, or on the project website.  By participating you have the opportunity to enrich the community’s understanding of one of its foundational sites and share what Eureka’s history means to you.

The questions in the survey are open to interpretation, and there’s no right way to answer them. Whether you grew up going to Fort Humboldt, or you’ve never been, you are invited to share your perspective.  And please share widely amongst your Eureka and Humboldt circles.”


One of Many Lucys

October 8, 2015

Lucy.Murder in Arcata.NCJCover..F.2015.1008

I recently (finally) finished a story about Lucy Romero for the North Coast Journal. It is an important story and I am thankful to Thad Greenson, their editor, for working so long and patiently with me to get it done.

There is one point I failed to include though and so want to share it here. This is from a post I did years ago, but it is just as important to remember now…

In the western movie, Broken Trail  , there is a scene where Robert Duvall struggles to learn the names of five Chinese girls under his care.  They speak no English and growing frustrated, Duvall’s character points to each one in turn and names them, “One, Two, Three, Four… “.  The girls accept the names, because they have no choice.

The same thing happened here.  When the white settlers arrived, they re “named” the native people.  Smo-Wa became Henry Capell (he was from the village of Capell).  Corn-no-wish became Weichpec Oscar.  Zo-wish-wish, a Wiyot woman related to Lucy’s daughter, Annie, was also known as “Rose”.

Lucy, the woman I write about, was only one of many “Lucys”.

 


Acme Garnishing Set & Oriental Mixture Tobacco

April 14, 2013

FrenchGulch.Merch1.Toothpaste-Personal

This is one of many  photos that will be coming from my trip to French Gulch-a gold mining town just off Hwy 299 west of Redding. Please let me know if you can identify the product from Del Norte County.


The Old Mining Town of Trinidad

March 23, 2013

HC.Trinidad.PstCard.OldMiningTown.StHwyLib

HC.Trinidad.Pre1915


Little Known History of Slavery in California

January 22, 2013
Child captives (who became child slaves)

Child captives (who became child slaves)

I was honored recently to be able to participate in the TedX Eureka  event where I presented on the History of Slavery (indenture) in California. That video is now posted on youtube:

Link to TedX Video

If you would like me to give a presentation similar to that in the video to your civic group or classroom, please email me at lynette.mullen@gmail.com.  

It is not pleasant history, but it is important and has been lost and forgotten too many times.

~Lynette


Squirrel or a lamp post?

March 16, 2012

Or Camp Grant?

That title was about as random as I could make it for a reason–and blog visitor Skippy is helping to make my point.

No one could identify Fort Grand or the Hausels. Maybe (though I’m not claiming we know for sure) that is because this is CAMP GRANT and the HANSELLS (Skippy’s very plausable theory).

I’ve lectured on this type of thing before but it has been a while.   Please, everyone, mark your photos clearly.  Then scan ’em if you haven’t. Print ’em if all you have are electronic copies.  Both are vulnerable. 

And if you have cool old photos and want to share, email them to me  at historyaddicts@gmail.com  and I’ll post them here. We’d love to see them.

The following came from Skippy.  Thanks Skip !

Here’s my guess about this picture:
 
It’s not Fort Grand, but Camp Grant near Dyerville on the Eel River.  It’s an easy misnomer to make.  Camp Grant was a military camp under the jurisdiction of Fort Humboldt.  Perhaps Fort and Camp were used interchangeably or confused altogether, and also Grand vs. Grant, too.  When I first saw the picture, this was the location I had immediately in my mind.

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