Survey about Fort Humboldt

April 1, 2016
Fort Humboldt Entrance Signs - 2
Nicholas Hubbard, who grew up in Humboldt and is currently going to school on the east coast, is doing a masters project focused on Fort Humboldt. He is asking local folks to respond to his survey-which will help him with his efforts.  Please take a moment to take the survey (it is quick and simple and will help him immensely). Thank you.
~L
Survey Link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/83SJHKL
From Nick:
“Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is a series of site specific installation and participatory performance events created by artist Nick Hubbard, that will take place in late April in Eureka.  The work examines the meaning of Fort Humboldt in the present day.
Nick has designed a survey as part of Through Various Hazards.  Your anonymous responses may appear as quotes on installation plaques, in tweets by the artist, or on the project website.  By participating you have the opportunity to enrich the community’s understanding of one of its foundational sites and share what Eureka’s history means to you.

The questions in the survey are open to interpretation, and there’s no right way to answer them. Whether you grew up going to Fort Humboldt, or you’ve never been, you are invited to share your perspective.  And please share widely amongst your Eureka and Humboldt circles.”


1906 Expulsion of the Chinese

January 24, 2016
The County photo is dated 1885, but Pfaelzer dates is 1906...

Source: Humboldt County Collection (notice the Yacht Club in the background)

Jeannie Pfaelzer included a photo in her book, Driven Out, The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans, that references a Chinese expulsion in Humboldt County in 1906- I’ve finally found the story…

In the summer of 1905, the Tallant-Grant Co. of Astoria, Oregon established a cold storage plant at Port Kenyon on the Salt River and with the commencement of the salmon season in October, purchased the fishermen’s catches for two cents a pound. During two months of fishing and at various times, daily receipts of nine, ten, and twelve tons were recorded (Ferndale Enterprise, 1 Aug. 1905; 17 Oct. 1905; 27 Oct. 1905; 5 Dec. 1905). Because Eel River salmon were no longer of the size or grade most desirable for cold storage purposes and in order to handle this surplus, the Company explored the feasibility of developing a cannery at Port Kenyon (Ferndale Enterprise 2 Oct. 1906). An inquiry was made to the Ferndale Chamber of Commerce about the employment of Chinese labor, without which, the Company claimed such a plant could not be successful. The Chamber responded that there would be no objection as long as certain conditions were met,including 1) the Chinese would work only at the cannery, 2) stay no longer than the period of operations, and 3) they would not be permitted at any time to leave the vicinity of the cannery (Ferndale Enterprise 22 June 1906). The Tallant-Grant Company built a 110×50 addition to the Port Kenyon Cold Storage Company building for the cannery, which began operations during the 1906 season. The investors felt that such a facility would be economically viable by utilizing the smaller salmon caught by the local fishermen and easily exported via the Salt River (Ferndale Enterprise 4 Sept. 1906; 9 Oct. 1906). Read the rest of this entry »


The Carson Block Turret

January 7, 2016
CarsonBlockTurret

Photos: NCIDC & Clarke Collections

Some day this project will be done and I’ll stop posting Carson Block Building photos. But not yet. I’m proud to say my client Pacific Builders is leading this project and doing an incredible job.


Carson Block – Then and Stucco and Now

January 6, 2016

Please click on the photos to enlarge and see details.

1892.12.23_Daily Humboldt Times (Humboldt County Library)

1892.12.23: Daily Humboldt Times (Humboldt County Library)

1904- Souvenir Photo-Carson Block Ext (Humboldt County Library)

1904- Souvenir Photo (Humboldt County Library)

Carson Block Building (Humboldt County Historical Society)

Humboldt County Historical Society

Carson Block Building (Humboldt County HIstorical Society)

Humboldt County Historical Society

NCIDC Collection

NCIDC Collection

NCIDC Collection

NCIDC Collection

North Coast Journal, January 2016

North Coast Journal, January 2016


One of Many Lucys

October 8, 2015

Lucy.Murder in Arcata.NCJCover..F.2015.1008

I recently (finally) finished a story about Lucy Romero for the North Coast Journal. It is an important story and I am thankful to Thad Greenson, their editor, for working so long and patiently with me to get it done.

There is one point I failed to include though and so want to share it here. This is from a post I did years ago, but it is just as important to remember now…

In the western movie, Broken Trail  , there is a scene where Robert Duvall struggles to learn the names of five Chinese girls under his care.  They speak no English and growing frustrated, Duvall’s character points to each one in turn and names them, “One, Two, Three, Four… “.  The girls accept the names, because they have no choice.

The same thing happened here.  When the white settlers arrived, they re “named” the native people.  Smo-Wa became Henry Capell (he was from the village of Capell).  Corn-no-wish became Weichpec Oscar.  Zo-wish-wish, a Wiyot woman related to Lucy’s daughter, Annie, was also known as “Rose”.

Lucy, the woman I write about, was only one of many “Lucys”.

 


The Eureka Woolen Mill

October 13, 2014

Eureka.WoolenMill.HSU.2012.02.0106

Source: Humboldt State University Special Collection [Palmquist/Yale 2012.02.0106]

Eureka_CA_HumboldtBayWoolenMills.Wikipedia.

 

The first photo was a random find-but a little internet search turned up the second graphic and Wikipedia (yeah, I know it isn’t gospel but can still be useful) provided the following. I didn’t know a simple photo could lead to something that makes me sad but it sounds like the demolition of this building was quite a loss…

 Wikipedia:

Humboldt Bay Woolen Mill manufactured woolen cloth from 1901 to after World War II. The mill was listed as a National Historic Monument but demolished by the City of Eureka in 1987.

History[edit]

When the Humboldt Bay Woolen Mill was built in 1901, the company was capitalized to $100,000[2] by several local businessmen including timber mill owner, William Carson,[3]sheep rancher Hugh Webster McClellan,[4] and rancher Robert Porter who continued as Vice-President of the newly formed company.[2] According to the 1902 Illustrated Map of Eureka, the other officers included J.W. Henderson, President and N. McMillan, Secretary.

The Mill manufactured woolen fabrics from 1901 until it closed after World War II.[5] After sitting empty for many years, it was listed on the National Register on 25 June 1982,[1] but it only survived five more years.[6] After the city designated it a dangerous building in 1987, local preservationists and the Eureka Heritage Society tried to get funding to rehabilitate it, but it was torn down in the same year.[5]

The Mill was described as an excellent example of Greek Revival architecture[6] and one of the few industrial buildings historically not associated with timber or fishing.[5] Some architectural features of the Mill were saved by historians before the demolition.[5] The site is currently a chain pharmacy, a grocery store and parking.[5] The destruction of this building rallied community activists to save other historically significant structures in Eureka.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b “Robert Porter”. Humboldt County, California – Biographies. Retrieved 6 March 2012.
  3. Jump up^ McDonald, Jill; Jim Morrison, John Disiere and Linda Disiere (2007). “Carson the Man & Times”. Carson Mansion History. The Ingomar Club, Eureka, California.
  4. Jump up^ “Webster McClellan 1836-December 31, 1911”. Humboldt County, California – Biographies. Retrieved 6 March 2012.
  5. ^ Jump up to:a b c d e f “Draft City of Eureka Historic Preservation Plan”. 10 March 2004. Retrieved 6 March 2012.
  6. ^ Jump up to:a b Overhold, Ken (Editor) (1987, Second Edition 1994). Eureka: An Architectural Heritage. Eureka, California: Eureka Heritage Society. p. 270. ISBN 0-9615004-0-9. Check date values in:|date= (help)

Hell on Wheels isn’t better than this…

August 28, 2014

So lately I’ve been watching a show on Netflix called Hell on Wheels, an AMC series about the building of the transcontinental railroad . I notice the hats sported by the characters on the show are the same as the ones worn by long-ago guests of the Pioneer Hotel – once located at Requa on the banks of the Klamath River. And they wear the same serious expressions.

The wild west was here too and I like that…

 

 

HSU Special Collections (1999.20.0037)

HSU Special Collections (1999.20.0037)