Sacred findings at Lyon’s Ranch, Bald Hills

July 1, 2011

Walk down this road and you’ll find this…

Enter the barn and you’ll find this…

In the barn

And this…

Then enter the Shepherd’s cabin and you’ll see this…

And this…

As well as the newspapers from 1912 that tell you how to rid yourself of gray hair (at your own peril, it seems).

At the risk of sounding hokey, it warms my heart to find all these great “artifacts” right where they belong…

If you visit, leave them there.  But take photos.  Lots of them.  And share, please…

Lyon’s Ranch is east of Orick on Bald Hills Road.  It is part of the park and open to the public.  If you go, bring your hiking/walking shoes as the homestead site is about two miles down the road.   But it is a beautiful road…


Hasty loveless union with no escape but death

February 18, 2010

 

Jan 31, 1863, Humboldt Times:

Marriage ought always be a matter of choice. Every girl ought to be taught that a hasty loveless union stamps upon her great dishonor, and that however dreary and toilsome a single life may be, unhappy married life is tenfold worse–an everlasting temptation, an incurable regret–a torment from which there is no escape but death.

 

This is quite ironic given all the forced “marriages”  endured by local Native American women during the settlement period.  I’ve come to realize that many of the women in those situations were incredibly courageous.  They endured, had and nutured families.  Fortunately, there were even some,  like Amelia Lyons  (per Susie Van Kirk), who  did enjoy loving and caring unions with their white “husbands”.

And for the most part, like it or not, it is the descendants of these unions that make up a majority of our local Native American population today.