Fort Humboldt Art Installation Starts April 23

April 20, 2016



New York-based, Eureka-raised artist Nick Hubbard will present a series of sculptural installations around town that engage with the history of Fort Humboldt.  The works will be first set in place this coming Saturday, April 23, 2016.  Some of the installations will disappear within a few days, other may take longer but they are all temporary.

A participatory event on Sunday, April 24, will accompany the installations.  The artist will be on-site at Fort Humboldt, and citizens are invited to come and jointly build a collection of paper models of the fort buildings.  These models will contain messages written by participants that will be shared back with the community over a timespan corresponding to the activity of the Fort.

The project, Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is derived from digital models constructed using documentary photographs of Fort Humboldt, utilizes 3D printing technology combined with traditional model-making, and takes the form of a series of expanded dioramas that change over time.

Nick Hubbard is currently a Master’s candidate at the Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP), Tisch School of the Arts, New York University.  Through Various Hazards is his thesis.  For more information, contact the project at or visit the project website,

Through Various Hazards is on Twitter @varioushazards.

#forthumboldt or #varioushazards

CONTACT:  E-mail:

Survey about Fort Humboldt

April 1, 2016
Fort Humboldt Entrance Signs - 2
Nicholas Hubbard, who grew up in Humboldt and is currently going to school on the east coast, is doing a masters project focused on Fort Humboldt. He is asking local folks to respond to his survey-which will help him with his efforts.  Please take a moment to take the survey (it is quick and simple and will help him immensely). Thank you.
Survey Link:
From Nick:
“Through Various Hazards and Adventures We Move is a series of site specific installation and participatory performance events created by artist Nick Hubbard, that will take place in late April in Eureka.  The work examines the meaning of Fort Humboldt in the present day.
Nick has designed a survey as part of Through Various Hazards.  Your anonymous responses may appear as quotes on installation plaques, in tweets by the artist, or on the project website.  By participating you have the opportunity to enrich the community’s understanding of one of its foundational sites and share what Eureka’s history means to you.

The questions in the survey are open to interpretation, and there’s no right way to answer them. Whether you grew up going to Fort Humboldt, or you’ve never been, you are invited to share your perspective.  And please share widely amongst your Eureka and Humboldt circles.”

Arcata Plaza, c. 1878

March 15, 2016
c. 1878. Brizard Collection (accessed at www.nps

c. 1878. Brizard Collection

I ran across this photo while doing research for a client and had never seen it before.

I have to wonder if the photographer climbed a tree, maybe, to get this angle…? (see comments for other theories).

We are looking from the G Street area down at the Plaza and the bay beyond.

Unfortunately this photo was taken a few years after a fire that took a lot of plaza buildings..

“In July 1875, a catastrophic fire swept the Plaza, burning the entire block to the north, all the buildings on the west half of the east side of the plaza and buildings on the block at the north east corner. ” [The Plaza, Arcata. by Susie Van Kirk]

Click on the photo to enlarge and enjoy…

Vance Hotel, from 1881 to Now

February 4, 2016

When I was young the Vance Hotel was run down and full of squatters. The renovation represents a great success story for Old Town.

Soon the Carson Block Building will as well.

The Vance…


Source: History of Humboldt County. Elliott, 1881 



1925 Source: Humboldt County Collection/Woods

387HSE00, 1/10/01, 3:09 PM, 8C, 6000x8000 (0+0), 100%, HSE1 Curve, 1/40, R1214, G1064, B1243,

Undated Source: HSU Special Collections/Ericson


Source: Google Earth, Street View


JOHN M. VANCE. – The late John M. Vance, of Eureka, at the time of his death the president of the Humboldt County Bank, became a resident of the county the year before he reached his majority, and it was the scene of his remarkable success, for in the management of extensive railroad, timber and milling interests he proved himself equal to unlimited responsibilities. Read the rest of this entry »

Eureka’s Washington Schools- 1, 2 & 3

February 1, 2016

HCOE.Washington 1 HCOE.Washington 2 HCOE.Washington 3

Thanks the the Humboldt County Office of Education for the photos.

1850s Eureka

January 29, 2016

Source: Humboldt County Collection




Early in 1856 the county seat was moved to Eureka from Arcata and business revived very much the spring thereafter. Ever since that date its course has been steadily onward, until now [1915] it is a city approximating fifteen thousand population, with excellent chances ahead of it. The town was incorporated on April 18, 1856, and the first election of officers resulted in a satisfactory manner as follows : Trustees, James T. Ryan, C. F. Ricks, A. F. Rollins, J. M. Eddy, and George Graham. C. F. Ricks was president of the board, and J. M. Eddy was secretary. Read the rest of this entry »

Results of an Arcata Tinman’s Hard Work…

January 27, 2016
Arcata 1881 Source: History Of Humboldt County,Elliott

Arcata 1881
Source: History Of Humboldt County,Elliott.  Left caption says: Robt. Burn’s Hardware Store. Right caption says: Burns Block.

You may recognize the commercial building on the upper right…

I have to admit I just grabbed this illustration out of Elliott’s book because it showed some early Arcata structures but I looked up Mr. Burns in the 1880 census ( He appears to have done very well as a “tinman” who immigrated from England…